High Contrast Thinking

IMG_2893 In my opinion, you can “be right”, or you can learn. As simple as that. The pursuit (or belief in) Rightness closes doors, closes perception, closes awareness.

The avoidance of Wrongness creates hesitation, cowardice, smallness. It diametrically opposes bravery and discovery.

Rightness also misleads, because the universe simply doesn’t work that way. However, I’ve come to believe that for anyone new to a skill, or new to a field of ideas, that a new learner naturally hews to what I call high-contrast thinking.

High-contrast thinking means looking at nouns, instead of verbs. Looking at facts, instead of relationships. It means looking for separation and identity. By doing this, a new mind can navigate this new world of learning they find themselves in. In essence, it means looking at “right” and “wrong”, “correct” and “incorrect”. In tracking, it means looking at the shape of a track and matching it with a pattern in your mind, or in a book. It means forcing reality to change to fit your model of reality. You have to begin here, of course.

But! You must keep going. You must move on from high-contrast thinking as soon as possible. This illusion that empowers  you to begin a journey, you must abandon for a richer perspective on the world as soon as possible.

Relationships, flows, verbs, context. The opposite of high-contrast. You might call it low-contrast; wherein you can barely see the edge of one domain as it slides along a continuum into another. High-contrast, like the tracking stick, always waits for  you to need it again. You can always go back there, and you will, though you will need it less and less as time goes on.

All models of the world come from high-contrast thinking, and essentially lie. But these lies can create life if they point to deeper currents of truth. Low-contrast thinking means pure-awareness without labels, navigating according to an unconscious sense of everything at once.

Written by Willem